Photo Of The Day

Stealing Children's Eyes -- A Common Business In China?!

At 4pm on 20th Sep. 2013, a 9 year old boy was visiting relatives with his mother when she realized the boy was missing after playing outside of the house. They could not find him anywhere, but at 10pm, video surveillance of the residential area showed the boy being taken into a nearby home and not coming out. The boy was killed by the young man living there, and by 3am the next day, the boy's body was found at a nearby river. His eyes had been removed, the corneas were missing, and he had suffered many knife wounds. It is not known at this stage whether other organs were taken.

A 6 year old boy was playing outside his home, but disappeared for 4 hours. He was found in a pool of blood, with his eyes dug out and thrown beside him, with the corneas taken.

Chinese police had announced that the boy's aunt was the perpetrator, but failed to present any evidence to the family while there were witnesses prepared to back up the aunt's claims of her wherabouts at the time of the boy's disappearance.

On Aug 27th in Hunan province, a 7 year old boy was taken away by 2 men according to the boy's classmates at Qiming school in Chenzhou city. 11 days later the boy's body was found, his eyes had been removed and other organs removed from his abdomen.

Organ harvesting from religious prisoners by the Chinese regime has been extensively documented. It would seem that no person - man, woman or child is safe from this crime against humanity when there is profit to be made.

Chinese Etiquette Before the Communist State PDF Print E-mail
Kaleidoscope
China Uncensored   

In traditional Chinese etiquette, there were a lot of teachings on the polite way to behave.  The ancient Chinese primary textbook,  "The Rules for Students" taught that when one is walking, one should walk calmly, not too fast not too slow; when one is standing, one should stand uprightly; when one is bowing, one should bow deeply and with respect; one should not sit with a foot on the threshold of a house, one should not recline against the door nearby, one should not sit with legs wide apart and one should not shake one’s thighs while standing."

The old saying that when one stands one looks like a pine tree, when one sits one looks like a clock (sitting there in a stable situation), was the basic rule of the ancient Chinese.

One should stand upright, modestly and naturally; one’s upper body should be upright, one’s head and eyes should be level and straight, and with a smile on one’s face, one's lower jaw should be slightly drawin backward, and one’s waist should be straight, with the abdomen held in and one’s body weight should fall equally on the feet, which would make the person slim and tall, full of spirit and energy. It was suggested that one should avoid reclining,feet opened too wide apart, and feet restless and moving, as this behaviour would make others think that this person is restless or unrestrained, and is a rude or impolite person.

It was suggested that if one stands for a long time, one can switch feet so that one foot is slightly ahead of the other, but one’s body should still stay upright, and the two feet should not be too far apart, and the switch should not be too frequent. One should also avoid reclining against a wall.

When one is sitting, it is suggested that one should sit with the upper body upright, the head upright, the eyes looking straight ahead, or looking at the person one is talking to. One’s back should slightly lean on the chair back, and it is forbidden for one to sit right back in the chair at a formal occasion or if a venerable one was sitting there. When one sits, one’s two palms should rest gently on one’s lap, legs should be bent naturally, and the lower legs should be basically vertical, with two feet resting flat on the ground. The distance between the two knees should be as wide as a released fist or two fists, and it was suggested the knees of ladies should not be apart. If one feels tired after sitting for too long in this way, one could switch to another position from time to time.

When elderly people were standing, one should not take one’s seat, only if the older people permit one to sit down, then one can take one’s seat. One should also remember to sit with ease and grace as this would show that this person is modest and well educated.



 

Search

Change font size

Banned Books

The 'Taboo' Show

The Reality

Magic Herbs

Related Items

Dynaweb

Open Forum